cc_rebecca_headercc_blog_spacerYou’ve probably heard the one about how the designer behind the famous “Morning After Bag” became a mom, right? There goes glamorous, fancy-free nights and here comes early morning feedings and clothes launder.

But Rebecca Minkoff hasn’t lost an shred of her fierceness. In fact, the birth of her son Luca three years ago has emboldened her even more.

First of all, his birth was natural. Drug-free, ladies. And when we saw her out and about a few weeks later, wearing Luca in her Ergo, it was at a cocktail party. Then we heard she nursed during meetings! And when we asked the designer herself, the truth was even wilder. She co-sleeps! She even pumps in meetings! (“It was awkward in Japan. They’d evacuate the room.”) She almost got in a bar-fight while wearing her baby! (“This girl was talkin sh*#. I was like, do you have a problem with me?!”)

So here’s this uber-successful designer – her designs are sold in more than 1,000 stores in 35 countries – making the kinds of choices (nursing, co-sleeping, front-pack as uniform) frequently associated with attachment parenting and  lovey-dovey hippies. She’s a fashion biz badass with a serious motherly instinct.

Her tour de force continues with two special arrivals this summer: In June, a flagship store on Greene Street in Soho and in August, baby #2. “I’m trying to figure out how I’m going to do that and have a fashion show a month later,” she says. We say: refresh your bad self with the sage stories you shared with us. Here’s 8 ways Rebecca stuck to her guns – the heck with what you think.
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cc_blog_rebecca_tipscc_blog_rebecca_tips1I met Brandon Holley when she was Editor in Chief of Lucky magazine. I was pregnant and planning to do natural childbirth, but she had a home birth. I was impressed! She’s the editor of a magazine, but she still came as close to nature as possible.

cc_blog_rebecca_tips2You only get a little nugget of time before they grow older. I feel like I saw too many people take a clinical approach to childbirth. And I was like, what’s the point?

cc_blog_rebecca_tips3My friend never breastfed because the nurse said she was starving her kid. They’re nurses, not police! You have to take the stance of this is what I’m gonna do. You have to command respect in yourself first.

cc_blog_rebecca_tips4Before the baby, I wanted to nurse for at least a year. And once we settled into a routine I thought I might go for two. But he broke up with me at 15 months. I’d follow him around with my boob! My husband told me: It’s his decision, let it go.

cc_blog_rebecca_tips5We’ve never had a set time for dinner because our schedules are so crazy. So, when we’re all together as a family, we eat. My husband and I believe in treating Luca as an adult in a little persons body –  we trust him and he tells us when he’s hungry.

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Too many people are scared of what other people think. When it came to nursing and pumping, I didn’t care. This is the best thing I can do for my kid. I was always: Don’t eff with me, this is what I’m gonna do.

cc_blog_rebecca_tips7The longest I’ve been gone for work is 5 days, and I’ll never go longer than that. It wasn’t good for me, it wasn’t good for him. But I know fashion editors that leave the baby for 3 weeks; I just can’t do that. You have to do what you feel comfortable with.

cc_blog_rebecca_tips8We’ve had to roll with it. Luca slept with us until he was a year old – in our bed until 7 months and then in a crib in the room. He learned to basically “pole vault” out of his crib, so then we trained him again, but we were traveling a lot and the jet lag made it all fall apart. He soon got his own room, but he started crawling into our bed at 6am. So what. I figure, there’s gonna be a point where he doesn’t want me. It’s OK if he crawls into my bed for now.

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Alice and Olivia founder Stacey Bendet Eisner is proud of the fact that her girls never have “typical” days. She’s constantly seeking out new creative activities for her two girls – Eloise, 5 and Scarlett, 3. What’s on her roster of musts? She opened her little black book to the best playgrounds, camps, and family entertainment in her home bases of Manhattan and Malibu.

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CMA in SoHo is a hands-down favorite for family time.


Brunch at the Soho House.

The playgrounds down by Battery Park

Ballet classes at the Joffrey School

Gymnastics lessons at Chelsea Piers

Karma Kids Yoga

Brunch at Sarabeths in Tribeca

Trapeze school in Brooklyn

Bowling at Brooklyn Bowl

HiArts camp is amazing in the summer.

We love treats from Dominique Ansel.

Vegetarian food from Blossom

Smoothies from One Lucky Duck

Family dinners at Nobu

For a road trip, Weezee World in Chappaqua is amazing!

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We love art classes with B
Johnson
, who comes to our house in Malibu.


Swim lessons with Lori
Armstrong
(world’s best swim teacher)
Contact: 310-457-4574

Pony camp at Cross Creek

Dance camp with Miss Charissa.

Weekends at the Malibu
Farmers Market
for flowers,
organic treats and amazing
baskets from the Kenyan
weaving artisans.

We love the beach at Little
Dume
.

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Thanks, but no thanks:

Breastfeeding Advice
to Ignore

You’d think breastfeeding would be a sacred art seamlessly passed down from generation to generation. Nope. It’s surprisingly a tricky business rife with old wives’ tales and outdated advice.

We asked lactation consultant Quetzal Currie, LM, IBCLC (who’s seen it all after 16 years in the business) for the most common tips doled out by well-meaning moms, grandmas, and sister-in-laws you can politely ignore.

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The Tip:



Rub lanolin on your nipples



The Truth:


Slippery nipples can actually make it harder for baby to get a deep latch, and some little ones don’t like the taste/texture. Plus if your nips are cracking, slathering them in goopy wax will keep them too moist to heal. Instead, speed the healing process by dabbing a saline solution (8 oz. water + ¼ tsp. salt) on nipples after nursing, exposing them to air as much as possible (read: go topless), and using breast shells under clothes.


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The Tip:



Don’t use a paci



The Truth:


In general it’s best to wait 4-6 weeks, but there are lots of exceptions. Some babies have powerful sucking reflexes and aren’t happy unless they’re sucking on something—if you’re not having latch issues, it’s totally fine to opt for a binky ASAP instead of becoming a human pacifier.


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The Tip:



It’s just going to hurt—until you develop calluses



The Truth:


Yes, it’s going to be uncomfortable at first. And it will get easier as baby’s mouth grows (not because your nipples get tougher). But you shouldn’t be bleeding or having persistent pain after the first few days. Don’t grin and bear it; that’s a sign you need help with the latch.


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The Tip:



She’s eating so often! (said judgily)



The Truth:


Older generations, especially those who formula-fed exclusively, may hint that babies should be put on a schedule. Currie advises nursing when baby is hungry, or as she says, “on demand—within reason.” Shoot for 15-30 minute feedings every 2-3 hours, but be flexible.


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The Tip:



You’ll get more sleep if you nurse lying down



The Truth:


Yeah, good luck with that. Currie considers it an “advanced technique” and a recipe for a shallow latch and sore nips. Until you’re a pro, sit upright in a comfortable chair, and strap on a My Brest Friend pillow (better for keeping baby at the right angle than the mushier Boppy). If your baby is flailing her arms, swaddle her first; you can always do skin-to-skin after nursing.


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The Tip:



Get baby on a bottle ASAP so Dad can bond – and help with feedings



The Truth:


Sweet sentiment, but don’t feel pressured. If you don’t have to pump, it’s best to wait 4-6 weeks, to avoid nipple confusion and overwhelming mom (she has enough going on as-is.) He’ll bond just fine while changing and swaddling the baby and taking care of you, thankyouverymuch.


Currie’s a baby and boob whisperer. To get in-person help in New York, Brooklyn, or New Jersey, email her at quetzalcurrie@gmail.com.

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21 Guilt-Free Educational Apps

Yep, there’s an app for that (and that and that and that). But only a handful are kid-friendly – and educator approved. We questioned three developmental experts – Dana Rosenbloom of Dana’s Kids and speech-language pathologists Jill Rappaport and Mara Cole – to find apps that entertain and educate kids from 12 months to 4 years old.

A few things to keep in mind:

1. Some are available in “lite” versions so you can try them before you buy.
2. The most value lies in apps that can engage toddlers one way and utilize different features for preschoolers.
3. Plan to participate with your child by following their lead to enhance the experience, especially early on.
4. Set limits from the beginning on when and how long kids can be on their tablet or phone.
5. For children under a year, limit exposure to just music and an occasional video.
6. Lead by example – if you don’t want your child using it incessantly, don’t do so in front of him.

Interactive Stories

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Vocabulary

Creativity

Learning the abc’s

Sorting, Classifying Skills

Shapes/Numbers/colors

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