Short answers from Kourtney Kardashian

Kourtney Kardashian delivered her two children  (Mason, 4.5 and Penelope, almost 2) on TV and literally pulled them out of her womb.  And not because she wanted the tabloid chatter but because it was her moment to embrace her calling: motherhood. She may be part of America’s most in-the-limelight family, but Kourtney’s a badass hands-on mom who puts her kids first and foremost.

The reality-TV-icon is expecting her third child with long-term boyfriend Scott Disick in December, and she’s currently summering in Southampton with her family, where she opened a Dash pop-up shop and is shooting Kourtney & Khloé Take The Hamptons.

As her own family grows, so does the Kardashian business empire: Dash boutiques, Kardashian Kollection (a women’s clothing line for Sears), Kardashian Beauty, and our current favorite Kardashian Kids – a girls apparel line for Babies “R” Us. (The second collection just hit shelves, and a boys collection is in the works.)

We quizzed the glam but totally down-to-earth mom about fitting in quality family time with an insane schedule, the beauty products she can’t give up and the secret smoothie recipe that keeps her going.

Natural Selection

I am slowly changing my beauty products over to safer choices. I love organic coconut oil instead of lotion for my body, which I also use on the kids. I ditched deodorant and used nothing for a while but have now found Lavanila Healthy Deodorant, which is great. I make sure that our products for Kardashian Beauty are made of non-toxic ingredients – our list of banned substances is longer than the list at Whole Foods, which makes me feel really proud.

Well, Almost

There are some face products I won’t give up, so I can’t bring myself to read what’s in them – for all I know, they are totally safe. I use Creme de la Mer at least once a day, Dr Brandt eye creams twice a day and Erno Lazslo black soap.

Falling For Flats

My style evolves with fashion and trends, but I also love timeless silhouettes that work for my body. I don’t think body-con dresses will ever go out of style, thanks to Azzedine Alaia. They look good on almost every woman’s body – it’s just all about how they are styled. We do some amazing ones for Kardashian Kollection. I do live for a good flat shoe now that I have children.

Run, Kourtney, Run

My idea of what is “fit” has evolved. I am not into being super skinny anymore. We are an active family and we try to eat healthy rather than dieting. We eat lots of fresh, organic foods. We do eat out a lot, which makes things a little trickier. Moderation is key for me. I still LOVE to run, I just don’t make time. I really do need that 30 minutes a day to be alone, listen to music and run. I think I just got inspired to start again.

A Race Against Time

Boundaries are crucial for a working mom. My children are my priority and always come first, which allows everything else to fall into place. Weekends are off limits for working unless absolutely necessary because that’s my family time.  I live for our precious naps when we all snooze together. We also do a lot of picnics and Disney movie nights. I just love being home with no one else around except my family. Solo time rarely exists for me. I need to make more time for that because I need it.

She Keeps Going And Going …

Surprisingly, I don’t drink coffee. I actually found out recently I am allergic to it. I love tea – either iced green or hot with honey, lemon and a little whole milk. I start every day with a green smoothie that gets me going. Here’s what’s in it (all organic):
•1 head of romaine lettuce
•1/2 bundle of spinach
•3 celery stalks
•1 apple
•1 pear
•1 banana
•1 teaspoon bee pollen
•1 tablespoon chia seeds
•Pinch of cardamom
•Couple drops of rose water
•Juice of ½ a lemon
•Small bunch of cilantro
•Small bunch of parsley

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Kids Incorporated

I love kids fashion. My grandmother actually has a children’s clothing boutique called Shannon and Co. that she’s had for 30 years. Every summer, we would go to La Jolla to visit and work in her store. My mom and I also had a children’s boutique before I had kids called Smooch, so it’s kind of in our blood. Now that Kim and I are moms, it just made sense. It’s for girls 0 to 24 months, but don’t worry, boys is in the works!

Head Designer

I took the reigns on the first collection because we started designing it ages ago before Kim was even pregnant. I thought about my favorite pieces, things that I would change or items that didn’t exist that I was always looking for. I got a biker jacket for Penelope as a gift and it’s real leather and amazing but it’s just not the most practical piece, so we made a version for the latest collection that’s really soft, thin and lightweight so it’s great for layering.

Photo Courtesy of The Coveteur / Trunk Archive

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Alice and Olivia founder Stacey Bendet Eisner is proud of the fact that her girls never have “typical” days. She’s constantly seeking out new creative activities for her two girls – Eloise, 5 and Scarlett, 3. What’s on her roster of musts? She opened her little black book to the best playgrounds, camps, and family entertainment in her home bases of Manhattan and Malibu.

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stacey_black_book_ny

CMA in SoHo is a hands-down favorite for family time.


Brunch at the Soho House.

The playgrounds down by Battery Park

Ballet classes at the Joffrey School

Gymnastics lessons at Chelsea Piers

Karma Kids Yoga

Brunch at Sarabeths in Tribeca

Trapeze school in Brooklyn

Bowling at Brooklyn Bowl

HiArts camp is amazing in the summer.

We love treats from Dominique Ansel.

Vegetarian food from Blossom

Smoothies from One Lucky Duck

Family dinners at Nobu

For a road trip, Weezee World in Chappaqua is amazing!

stacey_black_book_la

We love art classes with B
Johnson
, who comes to our house in Malibu.


Swim lessons with Lori
Armstrong
(world’s best swim teacher)
Contact: 310-457-4574

Pony camp at Cross Creek

Dance camp with Miss Charissa.

Weekends at the Malibu
Farmers Market
for flowers,
organic treats and amazing
baskets from the Kenyan
weaving artisans.

We love the beach at Little
Dume
.

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Thanks, but no thanks:

Breastfeeding Advice
to Ignore

You’d think breastfeeding would be a sacred art seamlessly passed down from generation to generation. Nope. It’s surprisingly a tricky business rife with old wives’ tales and outdated advice.

We asked lactation consultant Quetzal Currie, LM, IBCLC (who’s seen it all after 16 years in the business) for the most common tips doled out by well-meaning moms, grandmas, and sister-in-laws you can politely ignore.

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The Tip:



Rub lanolin on your nipples



The Truth:


Slippery nipples can actually make it harder for baby to get a deep latch, and some little ones don’t like the taste/texture. Plus if your nips are cracking, slathering them in goopy wax will keep them too moist to heal. Instead, speed the healing process by dabbing a saline solution (8 oz. water + ¼ tsp. salt) on nipples after nursing, exposing them to air as much as possible (read: go topless), and using breast shells under clothes.


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The Tip:



Don’t use a paci



The Truth:


In general it’s best to wait 4-6 weeks, but there are lots of exceptions. Some babies have powerful sucking reflexes and aren’t happy unless they’re sucking on something—if you’re not having latch issues, it’s totally fine to opt for a binky ASAP instead of becoming a human pacifier.


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breast_feeding_myths_calluses

The Tip:



It’s just going to hurt—until you develop calluses



The Truth:


Yes, it’s going to be uncomfortable at first. And it will get easier as baby’s mouth grows (not because your nipples get tougher). But you shouldn’t be bleeding or having persistent pain after the first few days. Don’t grin and bear it; that’s a sign you need help with the latch.


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The Tip:



She’s eating so often! (said judgily)



The Truth:


Older generations, especially those who formula-fed exclusively, may hint that babies should be put on a schedule. Currie advises nursing when baby is hungry, or as she says, “on demand—within reason.” Shoot for 15-30 minute feedings every 2-3 hours, but be flexible.


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The Tip:



You’ll get more sleep if you nurse lying down



The Truth:


Yeah, good luck with that. Currie considers it an “advanced technique” and a recipe for a shallow latch and sore nips. Until you’re a pro, sit upright in a comfortable chair, and strap on a My Brest Friend pillow (better for keeping baby at the right angle than the mushier Boppy). If your baby is flailing her arms, swaddle her first; you can always do skin-to-skin after nursing.


breast_feeding_myths_baby_on_bottle

The Tip:



Get baby on a bottle ASAP so Dad can bond – and help with feedings



The Truth:


Sweet sentiment, but don’t feel pressured. If you don’t have to pump, it’s best to wait 4-6 weeks, to avoid nipple confusion and overwhelming mom (she has enough going on as-is.) He’ll bond just fine while changing and swaddling the baby and taking care of you, thankyouverymuch.


Currie’s a baby and boob whisperer. To get in-person help in New York, Brooklyn, or New Jersey, email her at quetzalcurrie@gmail.com.

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21 Guilt-Free Educational Apps

Yep, there’s an app for that (and that and that and that). But only a handful are kid-friendly – and educator approved. We questioned three developmental experts – Dana Rosenbloom of Dana’s Kids and speech-language pathologists Jill Rappaport and Mara Cole – to find apps that entertain and educate kids from 12 months to 4 years old.

A few things to keep in mind:

1. Some are available in “lite” versions so you can try them before you buy.
2. The most value lies in apps that can engage toddlers one way and utilize different features for preschoolers.
3. Plan to participate with your child by following their lead to enhance the experience, especially early on.
4. Set limits from the beginning on when and how long kids can be on their tablet or phone.
5. For children under a year, limit exposure to just music and an occasional video.
6. Lead by example – if you don’t want your child using it incessantly, don’t do so in front of him.

Interactive Stories

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Vocabulary

Creativity

Learning the abc’s

Sorting, Classifying Skills

Shapes/Numbers/colors

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